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Efficient utilization of 40/100 Gbps long-distance network by a single TCP stream

Efficient utilization of single or a few TCP streams by user applications is the key to promote high-speed internet technology to scientific community and general communities. Our research group has developed several technologies to fully utilize 10 Gbps long-distance internet by TCP protocol, achieved more than 90% utilization of 10 Gbps TPC single stream performance using both artificial software and actual Web applications.

We started a new project whose goal is to achieve very high efficiency of TCP single streams on 40G/100G long distance network. We found that technologies we developed are not sufficient to achieve high-efficiency on 40/100 Gbps long-distance internet because the amount of on the fly is much larger than 10 Gbps network. Currently we are working on following optimization techniques:

  1. Modification of TCP buffer structure to accomodate with huge amount of on the fly data,
  2. Classification and discrimination of packet losses caused by congestion and caused by L1 level errors using machine learning,
  3. Estimation of the amount of counter traffic by measuring RTT of very low bandwidth probe packets.

As for performance evaluation, we performed local experiments using two servers with Mellanox PCI-express 3.0 NIC and two 40 Gbps switches. We observed 36.5Gbps (payload) bandwidth of a single TCP stream by iperf. Unfortunately, we do not have either a 40 Gbps delay emulator or long-distance 40/100 Gbps internet routes in Japan. This is the reason we need collaboration to Europe and US network institute to do empirical study of efficient use of a single TCP stream over 40/100G internet connection.

Speakers

Authors

  • Mary Inaba - Associate Professor, Department of Creative Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, the University of Tokyo.
  • Kei Hiraki - Professor, Department of Creative Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, the University of Tokyo
  • Akira Kato - Professor, Graduate School of Media Design, Keio University

Part of session

Lightning talks

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